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Search results for Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

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Sioux Warrior , 1935

by John David Brcin; Matthew J. Placzek

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Serbian-born sculptor John David Brcin was commissioned by architects John and Alan McDonald to create the sculptural panels adorning the four corners of the Joslyn building. This statue of a Sioux warrior, originally proposed and modeled by Brcin in the late 1920s for the entrance to the Museum, was ultimately deleted from the sculptural program in favor of a less decorated approach to the building. In 2008 Omaha sculptor Matthew Placzek was commissioned to realize Brcin’s work for Joslyn’s new sculpture garden.


Spirit of the Dance , 1932

by William Zorach

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Spirit of the Dance expresses an important concept in Zorach’s oeuvre: rhythm. In his sculpture, rhythm arises from the interrelationship of forms, the most basic of which is composed of a curve, a straight line, and a reverse curve. According to Zorach, rhythm is “continuity—flow—an untiring, non-monotonous movement . . . a quality without which any art is lifeless and dead.” He felt that rhythm was manifested most strongly in dance. In Spirit of the Dance a simply rhythmic pattern can be seen in the curve of the head and neck that joins with the straight line of the upright torso, which in turn is connected to the reverse curve of the buttocks and thigh. On loan by by the University of Nebraska at Omaha, 1974


Story-Telling Hut , 2009

by Patrick Dougherty

 

Mediums: Wood

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Discovery Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge Street

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: An internationally known sculptor of large-scale, site specific, temporary sculptures made from indigenous materials, Dougherty creates monumental environments by interweaving branches and twigs, without any outside means of attachment. His works allude to nests, cocoons, hives, and lairs built by animals, as well as the manmade forms of huts, haystacks, and baskets. He intentionally creates each work of art to look “found” rather than made, as if it has just fallen into or grown up naturally in its setting. Each work takes three to four weeks to construct and gradually disintegrates over a period of 18 to 24 months. The Joslyn installation is a circular structure in the shape of the letters Y-O-U-R S-T-O-R-Y. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds provided by Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Truhlsen.


The Omaha Riverscape , 2008-09

by Jesus Moroles

 

Mediums: Granite, Stone, Water

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge Street

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Moroles’ work reflects the ideas of eternity, stability, and longevity. “The stone itself is the starting point, and I feel a connection to it,” he said, adding that he aims to “make the stone important by drawing attention to it and to show the finished pieces as a result of an interaction between man and nature.” Moroles chooses pieces that can retain a suggestion of their original formation after he has worked on them. He does not use plans or drawings, but rather allows the stone’s veins, colors, and textures to guide him. In a process he calls “tearing granite,” Moroles gradually cracks the stone with “wedges” and “feathers,” never completely sure of the results but always pursuing his masterpiece. He always stops his work at the moment it reaches the fine line between natural and manmade. Certain forms appear again and again in Moroles work—the totem, obelisk, and stele—reflecting similar monuments erected since prehistoric times around the world. Some of his innovations in granite include pieces, such as the Broken Earth water wall that is part of the Joslyn installation, that appear woven into a fabric. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds from the Patron Circle for Contemporary Art and Ted and Helen Kolderie, 2009.


Trail Head , 8/2012

by Jayme Wyble; Aaron Price; Erik Abernathy; Carlos Alcantara

 

Mediums: Aerosol

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Series: Kent Bellows Studio Murals

Additional Information: Mural made possible with support from Omaha Public Works. Joslyn’s Kent Bellows Mentoring Program enrolled the mural artists into the Urban Arts Program, a graffiti abatement and prevention project aimed at giving teens interested in graffiti a legal and constructive outlet to express themselves while building professional mural skills.


Untitled , 1981

by John Henry

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: John Henry is known worldwide for his public works of art, which range in size from small tabletop pieces to some of the largest contemporary metal sculptures in the world. While identified by some in the 1970s as part of the Minimalist movement, the geometric forms that have defined Henry’s work for more than forty years have their aesthetic and historical base in Constructivism. He has a supreme commitment to the materiality of his work and an unwavering insistence on maintaining the integrity of the process and the materials in developing his visual vocabulary. This piece was a gift from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in 1991.


Untitled , 2005

by Jun Kaneko

 

Mediums: Ceramic

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Recognized for his high, rounded, monolithic glazed forms known as dangos (Japanese for dumpling), Kaneko has refined a technique for creating what might possibly be the largest ceramic sculptures ever made, setting him apart from all other ceramists. Even larger than his dangos are his human head forms, three of which were on view in 2008 on New York City’s Park Avenue Malls. Joslyn’s work is one of Kaneko’s human head forms. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds provided by Cathy and Troy Perry, Susan and A. J. Thomas, and Jan and Charles Vrana in memory of Jacqueline and Ernest Vrana, 2009.


Yellow Ascending , 1977

by George Sugarman

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Joslyn; Near parking lot Joslyn Museum 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: George Sugarman is associated with both the revival of large-scale outdoor sculpture in the late 1960s and the decorative movement in the 1970s. Innovative at the time in the use of color in his sculpture, Sugarman showed how color as well as form could define space in an abstract way. Turning his interest to large outdoor sculptures, Sugarman used sheets of steel to create complex metal works, overlapping and welding together flat cutouts to enclose a volume that looked like a leafy arbor or created an open, airy configuration. An outstanding example of Sugarman’s ability to translate his love of movement, color, and structure into a monumental metal sculpture, Yellow Ascending seems to rise weightlessly from the ground, like leaves tossed into the air. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece in honor of Leo A. Daly in 1983.


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