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Search results for Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

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Dineh , 1981

by Allan Houser

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Allan Houser, the most important individual in the development of contemporary American Indian sculpture and a significant figure in American art since the 1930s, was equally accomplished whether working with stone or bronze. His subjects were always Indian, but his themes, like the dignified Navajo couple here, are often universal. Houser’s sculptures range from completely realist to highly abstract, but his instantly identifiable signature style is a sinuous, elegant semi-abstraction of form. One of the most widely recognized bronze editions created by Houser, this 1981 modernist portrait of a Navajo couple displays the dignity and inner strength of the people known to themselves as "Dineh.” On loan from the collection of TIA, 2009


Doc’s Lounge Mural , 8/2014

by Enrique Rodriguez; Alex Roskelly; Giovani Barraza; Quinlan Sibbitt

 

Mediums: Aerosol

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Series: Kent Bellows Studio Murals

Additional Information: Mural made possible with support from Omaha Public Works. Joslyn’s Kent Bellows Mentoring Program enrolled the mural artists into the Urban Arts Program, a graffiti abatement and prevention project aimed at giving teens interested in graffiti a legal and constructive outlet to express themselves while building professional mural skills.


Generations

by Josiah Manzi

 

Mediums: Stone

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: A member of the Shona Tengenenge Sculpture Village, Manzi’s work evolves from his cultural and spiritual roots. Some of his sculptures lovingly represent a relationship with the world and its inhabitants and are naturalistic statements about the world around him. To Manzi the real world is not always a serious place. He delights in establishing surprising relationships between man and spirit, animal and man, and man and nature. He takes license with accepted notions of reality, and his sculptures are a play on orthodox ideas of form. Smooth and well-rounded, his carvings are stone made flesh: firm, toned, glowing, and smooth. Manzi does not include our view of the world in his art and does not always help us to understand his. This piece was a gift to the Joslyn museum by Richard and Frances Juro in 2007.


InsideOut Murals , 10/2014

by Watie White; Drew Shifter; Mike Giron; Richard Harrison; Kim Kuhn; Anthony Marx; Angela Saenz; Ryan Elder; Kara Kinkead; AD Swolley

 

Mediums: Acrylic, Aerosol

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Murals made possible with support from the Douglas County Commissioners. Joslyn’s Kent Bellows Mentoring Program enrolled the mural artists into the InsideOut Program, a juvenile justice outreach project aimed at giving detained teens an outlet to express themselves while collaborating with KBMP students.


Large Covered Wagon , 2004

by Tom Otterness

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Downtown, Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Humorous and irreverent, Otterness’ stylized bronze figures combine into sculptural ensembles that explore the range of human experience, from grand ambition to common foibles, plucking imagery and themes from popular culture and subtly transforming them into amusing commentary on modern society. Gift of Willis A. Strauss Family, 2009


Moment , 2009

by Albert Paley

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Downtown, Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Albert Paley has been heralded for his inventive approach to form development and metal technique in his large-scale sculpture. The site-specific metal assemblages Paley has created over the past three decades place him not only in the forefront of contemporary sculpture but also in the vanguard of artists working in the new, genre-defying area that has been called “Archisculpture.” His inclusion in this group is due to his skill in merging boundaries between the two disciplines and his innovative experiments with environmental and formal considerations. On loan from by Gerald Peters Gallery, Santa Fe, 2010


Oedipus at Colonnus , 1968

by Leonard Baskin

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Leonard Baskin considered his sculptures ”memorials to ordinary human beings, gigantic monuments to the unnoticed dead: the exhausted factory worker, the forgotten tailor, the unsung poet . . . . Sculpture at its greatest and most monumental is about simple, abstract, emotional states, like fear, pride, love and envy .” Oedipus at Colonus (spelled differently in the title of the sculpture) is one of the three Theban plays of the Athenian tragedian Sophocles. The play describes the end of the blinded Oedipus’ tragic life, said to have occurred at Colonus, a village near Athens and Sophocles’ own birthplace. Gift of Lawrence Fleischman, 1980


One of the Burghers of Calais: Andrieu d’Andres , ca 1884

by Auguste Rodin

 

Mediums: Bronze

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: This figure is from Rodin’s monument titled The Burghers of Calais commemorating the surrender of the besieged French city of Calais to English King Edward III in 1347. With the people desperately short of food and water, six of the leading citizens, or burghers, of Calais offered themselves as hostages to Edward in exchange for the freedom of their city. The king agreed, ordering them to dress in plain garments, wear nooses around their necks, and journey to his camp bearing the keys to the city. Although the king intended to kill the burghers, his pregnant wife, Philippa, persuaded him to spare them, believing that their deaths would be a bad omen for her unborn child. Andrieu d’Andres was among the six burghers who offered themselves as hostages. Expecting death, his pose and gesture express anguish and desperation. In this sculpture, Rodin deftly captures a moment poignant with a mix of defeat and heroic self-sacrifice. His characteristic modeling style, leaving shadowy hollows and gleaming ridges, perfectly describes the figure’s emaciated physique. Gift of John and Carmen Gottschalk and G. Woodson and Anda Howe, 2002


Pawn , ca. 1980

by Sidney Buchanan

 

Mediums: Steel

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge St.

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Sidney Buchanan is perhaps the best known Nebraska artist working in welded metal sculpture. A former professor of sculpture at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, Buchanan’s monumental, imposing public art is on view throughout Omaha. His reconstructed found-art sculptures are shaped from junkyard pieces of steel — 1950s auto bumpers, chunks of locomotives and boilers, and twisted beams from demolished buildings. This piece was a gift to the Joslyn museum by Philip J. Willson in 2008.


Pencil Bench , 2009

by Ron Parks

 

Mediums: Stainless Steel

Location: Joslyn; Joslyn Art Museum Discovery Sculpture Garden 2200 Dodge Street

Owner: Joslyn Art Museum

Additional Information: Omaha artist Ron Parks is applies to the creative process the knowledge and experience gained from a 30-year career of inventing, designing, and fabricating in metals. Fusing the fabricated with the natural, each piece invites the viewer to join in by teasing one’s sense of reality. Light strikes angle and veers off; shadow glides along curve; imagination blends with craftsmanship. The Joslyn museum purchased this piece with funds provided by Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Truhlsen.


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